We love speaking to our dogs. In fact, we probably have better conversations with them than we do with humans! Well, they're always so attentive - and they don't answer back...

Let's face it, our dogs just make everything feel better, especially when they look at us with those loving eyes and tilt their head-

Wait, what's that about?

It's their go to response when we say the magic words (you know, "walk" or "treat"), but what does it really mean when they tilt their head?

Apparently, it's all to do with emotion. No, really, it's thought to be a sign that our furry friends are picking up on our emotions and responding accordingly.

Yes - dogs have empathy too!

Dogs are very good at reading small signs that their humans give them, from facial expressions, to body language and voices.

It doesn't have to be positive either. Dogs will tilt their head whether we're enticing them to take a walk, or telling them off for trying to steal food.

Obviously, our dogs don't understand all of the words that we say. They do, however, pick up on specific words, as well as tone and inflection, and judge their response accordingly.

As well as sounds, dogs are very in tune with their human's emotions, and will tilt their head to try and gain a better understanding. We know that dogs are great for our mental health, and their attentiveness is one of the main qualities that helps to pick us up.

Their natural empathy can also help us in surprising ways. A new scheme in Scotland is using dogs to help children learn to read, and relies upon their attentiveness to encourage the children to progress at a faster rate. And, they don't judge - hence why we love them so much!

So, there you have it. When our dogs tilt their head, they're actually trying to understand and communicate with us!

Who'd have thought it?

At Tailster, we're always looking for new, trustworthy carers to join our UK wide network. If you think you'd be well suited, click here for more information on how you can sign up and join our carer network.

Share on facebook
Share on google
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin