The more you surround yourself with dogs, the more you'll notice their many unusual habits - trust us, the list is endless.

Whether they're running round in circles or barking at thin air, it's their quirks that make them so loveable and make us want to spend as much time as possible with them.

As much as we love them, however, sometimes we're intrigued as to what their idiosyncrasies really mean...

Does Your Dog Ever Sneeze When They're Playing?

Fred Studio White Tailster

Sneezing is one of the most noticeable tendencies that dogs have, often putting all of their effort into it after a good old play or cuddle.

Yes, dogs may sneeze when something's irritating their nose - much like humans do - but it's also a method of communication to other dogs around them, and a means of conveying information.

So, if your dog sneezes a lot while you play, here's why it's a good thing...

Why Do Dogs Sneeze When Playing?

White Studio Brad

A common behavioural trait, dogs sneeze after a period of playing with their owners - or other dogs, for that matter - as a means of letting those around them know that they recognise that a game is taking place.

Think about it - how many times have you seen two dogs playing and been on standby, waiting for a fight to break out? It's an easy mistake to make.

By sneezing, dogs give off a visible sign that they're comfortable in the situation and in no way feel threatened.

Not only does it let those around them know that they're ok, it also acts as a reminder to other dogs that they aren't being aggressive and that the play should be kept at a similar level.

So, there you have it - if your dog sneezes a lot when they're with you, it's likely a sign that they're having a good time!

Work, family and social commitments mean that there often aren't enough hours in the day to give our pets the attention that they deserve. Click here to find out how Tailster can put you in contact with hundreds of pet carers in your local area, meaning that you can rest in the knowledge that your pets are being well looked after.

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